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Charlie Tjapangati B.1949

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Charlie Tjapangati is a renown Australian artist. Charlie started painting for Papunya Tula Artists cooperative in 1978. He is one of the leading Papunya Tula artists whose artworks are sought after by collectors worldwide.

In 1981 Charlie Tjapangati  traveled to America together with Billy Stockman one of the old Masters and the founder of Papunya Tula Artists for 'Mr. Sandman bring me a Dream' exhibition.

Charlie Tjapangati work is highly sought after by collectors worldwide. He represented by some of Australia's and the wide World most important public and private collections.

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Artist: Charlie Tjapangati
Title:
Tingari Business CT0702
Medium: Synthetic Polymer Paint on Belgian linen
Dimensions: 95 cm x 95 cm
Price: $6800 Buy-now  Enquire

Artist: Charlie Tjapangati
Title: Tingari Business CT0703
Medium: Synthetic Polymer Paint on Belgian linen
Dimensions: 95 cm x 95 cm
Price:
$6800 Buy-now  Enquire
Shipping worldwide or Pick Up from Galeria Aniela

Tingari men business

Both paintings CT0702 and CT0702 depict an ancient story of Mythological Times the travels of a large group of Tingari men.

Charlie Tjapangati work generally depict the significant ceremonial story of the Tingari Cycle.

"Classical" Tingari cycle paintings typically contain a network of roundels (concentric circles, which often signify sites) interlinked by lines which indicate travel (Bardon 1991).

The Tingari men were a group of ancestral elders who in the Dreaming time travelled over vast areas of the Western Desert, performing rituals and creating or "opening up" the country (Perkins & Fink 2000)

The Tingari men camped at the site of “Yatturlnga” before traveling east passing through “Kiwirrkura” area. The men travel on to “Tarkul” North of Mount Webb and then North to Lake Mackay.

The travel of Tingari men is depicted in the centre of painting. The wavy lines depict the sand hill surrounding the soakage water site of Yatturlnga, southwest of Jupiter Well. Since events associated with Tingari Cycle are of a secret nature no further details are given.

 

Tingari-related visual designs, such as those used in ceremonial body and ground paintings, are usually considered "dear" rather than "dangerous" by traditional owners, which may explain why so many artists have concentrated on the Tingari in paintings produced for public display and sale by Papunya Tula.

Even so, the more esoteric elements of these designs were usually modified or omitted by the artists, and this is particularly true of recent works.

The surface narrative elements that are often termed the painting’s ‘story’ or ‘Dreaming’ are only one level of an Aboriginal painting’s true significance.

The imagery employed by Aboriginal artists has a deep cultural resonance that often defies simple logic or narrative interpretation. The western viewer can, however, intuitively feel the power of this spiritual resonance without necessarily having to understand the details, which are essentially for the initiated only.

The Tingari men were usually accompanied by recently-initiated novices to whom they provided instruction in the ritual and law of the region. The adventures of the Tingari groups are enshrined in numerous song-myth cycles which provide explanations for contemporary customs in Western Desert aboriginal life.

The adventures of the Tingari groups are enshrined in numerous song-myth cycles which provide explanations for contemporary customs in Western Desert aboriginal life.

Deep knowledge of Tingari business is restricted to men possessing appropriate levels of seniority in Western Desert society, but many stories have "public versions" which do not disclose secret/sacred knowledge.

In the Tingari heartland of the Gibson Desert, three major journey-lines can be discerned (Myers 1986). One begins west of Jupiter Well and eventually runs due east, concluding south-east of Lake Mackay another heads south-west from near Kintore for some 200 km, and then doubles back to end at Lake Macdonald; the third runs from south to north through Docker River and Kintore.

At the many sites that make up these song lines, groups of Tingari people held ceremonies, experienced adversity and had adventures, in the course of which they either created or became the physical features of the sites involved. In mythological terms, Tingari exploits often add to or modify features at pre-existing sites, or revive and extend more ancient local Dreamings.

The oral narratives that describe these adventures stretch to thousands of verses, and provide countless topographical details that would assist nomadic bands to navigate and survive in the arid landscape.

In Pintupi narratives, the male Tingari groups are usually followed by groups of women who may be accompanied by children.

The more public women's stories usually revolve around the gathering and preparation of bush foods. However, other narratives relate to a group of powerful ancestor women – the Kanaputa (Ganabuda) or Mungamunga who often travelled in a Tingari ritual group.

These Tingari women were sometimes accompanied by young girls, whom they provided with ritual education, and were often followed by (or following) groups of Tingari men. Many of the Kukatja stories collected at Balgo relate to the Kanaputa.

In the Tingari heartland of the Gibson Desert, three major journey-lines can be discerned.

One begins west of Jupiter Well and eventually runs due east, concluding south-east of Lake Mackay another heads south-west from near Kintore for some 200 km, and then doubles back to end at Lake Macdonald; the third runs from south to north through Docker River and Kintore.

At the many sites that make up these song lines, groups of Tingari people held ceremonies, experienced adversity and had adventures, in the course of which they either created or became the physical features of the sites involved. In mythological terms, Tingari exploits often add to or modify features at pre-existing sites, or revive and extend more ancient local Dreamings.

The oral narratives that describe these adventures stretch to thousands of verses, and provide countless topographical details that would assist nomadic bands to navigate and survive in the arid landscape (Petri 1970:263). In Pintupi narratives, the male Tingari groups are usually followed by groups of women who may be accompanied by children.

The more public women's stories usually revolve around the gathering and preparation of bush foods. However, other narratives relate to a group of powerful ancestor women, the Kanaputa (Ganabuda) or Mungamunga who often travelled in a Tingari ritual group.

These Tingari women were sometimes accompanied by young girls, whom they provided with ritual education, and were often followed by (or following) groups of Tingari men. Many of the Kukatja stories collected at Balgo relate to the Kanaputa.

 

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Papunya Tula

In 1972 the artists established their own company, Papunya Tula, which derives its name from both the settlement's name and one of the hills in the area, Tula, a Honey Ant Dreaming site. In the late 1970s and early '80s, after the establishment of the Aboriginal Land Rights Act, many people moved back to their traditional homelands, to country as far west as Kintore and Kiwirrkura in Western Australia.

In the 1980s the movement flourished and other desert communities such as Utopia, Yuendumu and Balgo began to produce works of art for an outside audience.

In 2000, the Art Gallery of NSW held an exhibition, curated by Hetti Perkins, for the Sydney Olympic Games Arts Festival. This exhibition was to firmly place the movement on the national, and international, stage.

For a period of several months (27 November 2007 to 3 February 2008), the National Museum of Australia exhibited a collection of Papunya paintings from the first few years of the movement.

Most of the works displayed in the collection have not been seen before by the general public as most of these paintings were bought by (the now defunct government agency) the Aboriginal Arts Board of the 1970s-1980s.

The exhibition contains some of the most priceless and earliest works by the first generation, senior Papunya painters. These paintings were previously displayed in government offices and embassies. This exhibition was curated by Professor Vivien Johnson and is significant in introducing the movement's impact to the mainstream.

 

Two Papunya artists, Tommy Watson and Ningura Napurrula, are also represented in the World most important museum, the Musée Quai Branly in Paris, the Museum dedicated to indigenous art of the world.

Ningura Napurrula's signature black and white motif appear superimposed on the ceiling of the administration part of the museum's building.

 

we offer an opportunity to purchase original museum-quality artworks of impeccable provenance

Charlie Tjapangati biography

Artist: Charlie Tjapangati  was born  circa 1949North West of Jupiter Wells of the Pintupi Tribe

Tribe/Clan:  Pintupi

Country: Kiwirrkura   Area: Central and Western Desert

Western Desert Language Western Desert also known as Papunya Tula

Charlie Tjapangati is a renown Australian Pintupi artist. Charlie started painting for Papunya Tula Artists cooperative in 1978.

Charlie Tjapangati is one of the leading Papunya Tula artists whose artworks are sought after by collectors worldwide.

 

AWARDS

In 1981 Charlie Tjapangati  traveled to America together with Billy Stockman one of the old Masters and the founder of Papunya Tula Artists for 'Mr. Sandman bring me a Dream' exhibition.

Dreamtime Wikipedia

 

Collections

Charlie Tjapangati work is represented in Australia and around the world

Art Gallery of South Australia

Queensland Art Gallery

Museum & Art Gallery Northern Territory

World Vision Birrung Gallery

Australian Art Gallery

Art Gallery of South Australia (Adelaide)

Queensland Art Gallery (Brisbane)

National Gallery of Australia (Canberra)

Museum & Art Gallery Northern Territory (Darwin)

Art Bank (Sydney)

National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne)

Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne)

Art Gallery of Western Australia (Perth)

Homes a Court Gallery and gallery Collection (Perth)

Tasmanian Museum and National Art Gallery (Hobart)

Kelton Foundation California, USA

Flinders University Art Museum

Aboriginal Art Museum, Utrecht The Netherlands

AAMU Museum for contemporary Aboriginal Art, The Netherlands

University of Virginia USA

World Vision Australia - Birrung Gallery

 

Exhibitions

1980 Contemporary Australian Aborigine Paintings, Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, California, USA

1981 Australian Perspecta, A Biennial Survey of Contemporary Australian Art, Art Gallery of NSW Sydney

1982 Brisbane Festival, Brisbane

1982 Georges Exhibition, Melbourne

1983 Mori Gallery, Sydney

1989 Masterpiece Fine Art Gallery, Hobart

1990 Paintings from the Desert, Contemporary Aboriginal Paintings

1990 Plimsoll Gallery, Centre for the Arts, Hobart, Tasmania

1992 Crossroads-Towards a New Reality, Aboriginal Art from Australia

1992 National Museums of Modern Art, Kyoto and Tokyo

2004 21st Telstra National Aborigainal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum Northern Territory

2005 Papunya Tula Artists, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne

2005 Papunya Tula Artists - new work for a new space, Utopia Art Sydney

2005 Rising Stars Papunya, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.

2006 Papunya Tula Artists - across the board, Utopia Arts Sydney, Sydney

2006  Rising Stars 2006, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne

 

Dreamtime

The expression "Dreamtime" was coined in 1899 by Spencer and Gillen (who conducted formative anthropological work on Australian prehistory) from alcheringa of the Arrernte language.

"Dreamtime" is often used as a collective term for all the Dreamings of the indigenous peoples, though "The Dreaming" is a synonym for "Dreamtime" and is culturally preferred by Indigenous Australian people.

"The Dreaming" in modern scholarship often refers to the "time before time", "time outside of time" or "time of the creation of all things", as though it were the past. But The Dreaming in a real sense is also present and in the future.

The anthropologist and historian W.H. Stanner preferred "the Dreaming" to "the Dreamtime" and saliently describes it as "the Everywhen".

This is an apt and evocative approximation to what the Indigenous Australian Peoples refer to in translation as the "All-at-once" Time which is experienced as a co-existing confluence of past, present and future.

This does not counter the Indigenous Australians People's concept of linear time, but it informs and qualifies it.

Indigenous Australians considered the Everywhen of the Dreaming to be objective, whilst linear time was considered a subjective construction of waking consciousness of one's own lifetime.

This is in the converse of the European concept which views dreams as subjective and linear time as objective.

 

References

Australian Aboriginal art

Geoffrey Bardon

Kluge-Ruhe Museum

Papunya - Toas

Papunya Tula Gallery

Art Gallery of NSW, Papunya Tula Exhibition of 2000

National Museum of Australia Exhibition: Papunya Painting 28 November 2007 - 3 February 2008

Dreamings of the Desert: Aboriginal dot paintings of the Western Desert, Art Gallery of South Australia, 1996, ISBN 0-7308-3073-X

Geoffrey Bardon, Aboriginal Art of the Western Desert,1979, Adelaide: Rigby

Geoffrey Bardon, Papunya Tula: Art of the Western Desert, 1991, ISBN 0-86914-160-0 Sydney: McPhee Gribble/Penguin

Geoffrey Bardon and James Bardon, Papunya: A Place Made After the Story: The Beginnings of the Western Desert Painting Movement, 2006, Miegunyah Press, University of Melbourne

Roger Benjamin, 2005, The beginnings of the Western Desert painting movement, The Age, January 29

Vivien Johnson (ed), Papunya Painting: Out of the desert 2007, Canberra: National Museum of Australia.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dreamtime Return - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Galeria Aniela is committed to significant dynamic artists such as Charles Blackman, Arthur Boyd, Jamie Boyd, John Perceval, John Olsen, Robin Holliday, Brett Whiteley, Garry Shead, Mrs. Bennett, Deborah Halpern, Lily Kelly Napangardi, Ningura Napurrula, Gloria Petyarre, Nancy Ross we aim to be a place of experience and inspiration.

Combining the knowledge of fine art and financial expertise, with over 20 years experience in the World Art Market, and a wide network of resources, we offer an opportunity to purchase original museum-quality artworks of impeccable provenance.

We recognize the importance of the buyer confidence in purchasing genuine art. Whether you are a first time buyer, an enthusiastic collector or an astute investor, our people focused approach ensures an enjoyable and rewarding experience.

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